Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel, Kane, Pennsylvania, USA

Thomas L. Kane, although not a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was nevertheless a courageous supporter of the Latter-day Saints. Kane first came into contact with the Mormons in May 1846 at a conference held in Philadelphia where he met Jesse C. Little who was trying to get support for the Saints’ journey west.1

Kane helped negotiate the enlistment of members of the Mormon Battalion and traveled to Utah as an unofficial negotiator to promote peace during the Utah War. He was a strong supporter for Utah Statehood. When Brigham Young passed away, he traveled to Utah to express his remorse and reaffirm his support to the Saints. 2 He was a loyal friend of the Church until his death in 1883.3

Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

In 1878, Kane built a Presbyterian chapel at the request of his aunt, Ann Gray Thomas. He expressed before his death that he would like to be buried between the stone entrances of the chapel. 4

The chapel was acquired by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1970 and restored. Two years later, a statue of Major General Kane was placed on the premises. The building currently serves as a meeting place for the local branch and contains a family history center in the basement.

Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

SOURCES

 

1 Encyclopedia of Mormonism, 1-4 vols., edited by Daniel H. Ludlow (New York: Macmillan, 1992), 780.

2 Leonard J. Arrington, “‘In Honorable Remembrance’: Thomas L. Kane’s Services to the Mormons,” BYU Studies, Volume 21, Number 4, (Fall 1981), 395.

3 Encyclopedia of Mormonism, 779.

4 “In Honorable Remembrance’, 400.

Map & Directions


View Larger Map

Admission: Free

Photos

Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

Articles & Resources

“General Thomas L. Kane,” Contributor, 1884.

Leonard J. Arrington, “In Honorable Remembrance’: Thomas L. Kane’s Services to the Mormons,” BYU Studies, 1981.

W. J. Ashton, “Defender of Zion: Pioneer Benefactor Thomas L. Kane,” Pioneer, 1994.

Norman R. Bowen and Albert L. Zobell, Jr., “General Thomas L. Kane: The Soldier,” Ensign, June 1971, 23.

Norman R. Bowen and Albert L. Zobell, Jr., “General Thomas L. Kane: The Pioneer,” Ensign, October 1971, 2.

Elizabeth Wood Cane, Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona, 1874.

Donald Q. Cannon, “Kane, Thomas L.,” Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow, 1992.

Kate B. Carter, comp., “Col. Thomas L. Kane and the Mormons,” Treasures of Pioneer History, 1957.

Augusta Joyce Cocheron, “Reminiscence of General Kane,” Contributor, 1885.

Sherman L. Fleek, “Thomas L. Kane: Friend of the Saints,” Mormon Heritage Magazine, 1994.

Thomas L. Kane, The Mormons, 1850.

Thomas L. Kane, The Private Papers and Diary of Thomas Leiper Kane. A Friend of the Mormons, 1937.

Richard D. Poll, “Thomas L. Kane and the Utah War,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 1993.

Mark Metzler Sawin, “A Sentinel for the Saints: Thomas Leiper Kane and the Mormon Migration,” Nauvoo Journal, 1998.

Daniel Tyler, A Concise History of the Mormon Battalion in the Mexican War, 1846-1847, 1881.

Lance B. Wickman, “Thomas L. Kane: Outrider for Zion,” Ensign, Sept. 2003, 56.

R. W. Young, “Major General Thomas L. Kane,” Millennial Star, 1910.

Albert L. Zobell, Jr., Sentinel in the East: A Biography of Thomas L. Kane, 1965.

Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel PDF