John Johnson Farm, Hiram, Ohio, USA

The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.

The John Johnson Farm served as headquarters for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for nearly a year, from September 1831 to September 1832. Important conferences were held there. Moreover, in an upper room of the house, perhaps sixteen revelations now in the Doctrine and Covenants were received. These include Doctrine and Covenants section 1, the Preface, and section 76, the vision of the three degrees of glory.

The Prophet Joseph continued his work of the translation of the bible while living here, and the John Johnson Farm was where the Prophet and Sidney Rigdon were dragged from the house and tarred and feathered on March 24, 1832.1 Five days later, Joseph and Emma’s adopted son, Joseph Murdock, died due to complications resulting from exposure.

Interior view of the John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.
Room in the John Johnson home where D&C 76 was revealed. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.
Interior view of the John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.
Interior view of the kitchen in the John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.

Key Events at the John Johnson Farm

– On February 16, 1832 Joseph and Sidney received the revelations of the three degrees of glory, Doctrine & Covenants Section 76.

– Joseph and Sidney were tarred and feather after being dragged from the farm house on March 24, 1832.

The Johnson’s were converted in the Spring of 1831 with the healing of John’s wife Elsa from rheumatism in her shoulder.2 Two of the Johnson’s sons, Luke and Lyman Johnson became members of the original Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and their daughter, Marinda, married Orson Hyde.

The Johnson’s fell away from the Church in 1837, although Luke returned to the faith and traveled with the Saints to Utah.3 Father Johnson died in 1843 in Kirtland where he is buried.

Headstone of John Johnson in the Kirtland North Cemetery adjacent to the Kirtland Temple. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.
Headstone of John Johnson in the Kirtland North Cemetery adjacent to the Kirtland Temple. Photo (2008) by Kenneth Mays.

In 1956, the farm was purchased by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For a number of years it served as a welfare farm for the Church. Presently it does not.

The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson farm at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.

SOURCES

 

1 Joseph Smith, History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 7 vols., introduction and notes by B. H. Roberts (Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1932-1951), 1: 263 – 264.

2 Larry C. Porter and Susan Easton Black, eds., The Prophet Joseph: Essays on the Life and Mission of Joseph Smith (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1988), 163.

3 Susan Easton Black, Who’s Who in the Doctrine and Covenants (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1997), 156 – 157

Map & Directions


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Ownership Status

The Historic Johnson Home is owned and operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Visitors are welcome seven days a week during normal hours. Admission is free.

Photos

The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (1998) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio prior to restoration. Photo (1998) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson Hiram, Ohio home during restoration. Photo (1999) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson Hiram, Ohio home during restoration. Photo (1999) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.
The John Johnson home at Hiram, Ohio. Photo (2009) by Kenneth Mays.

Articles & Resources

Joseph Smith, Jr.'s Account of Being Tarred & Feathered

Author(s): Joseph Smith, Jr.
Type: First-person account
Source(s): Joseph Smith, History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 7 vols., introduction and notes by B. H. Roberts (Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1932-1951), 1: 263 – 264.

On the 24th of March, the twins before mentioned, which had been sick of the measles for some time, caused us to be broken of our rest in taking care of them, especially my wife. In the evening I told her she had better retire to rest with one of the children, and I would…

John Johnson Home, at JosephSmith.net

John Johnson Home, at Doctrine & Covenants Revelvation Sites Website

Keith Perkins, “A House Divided: The John Johnson Family,”  Ensign, February 1979, 54.

Mark L. Staker, “Remembering Hiram, Ohio,”  Ensign, October 2002, 32.

John Johnson Farm PDF