Family Living Center, Nauvoo

Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

One of the outstanding educational and family friendly places to visit at  historic Nauvoo, Illinois is the Family Living Center. Skilled missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints staff this facility dressed in period clothing and demonstrate timeless skills in producing everyday items made by the Saints who lived in Nauvoo from 1839-46. These items may be made of wood, metal, clay and other materials. Other presentations include a wide variety of 19th-century trades such as spinning, bread making, candle making, pottery, rope and barrel making. Visitors, including children, are allowed to participate in some of the demonstrations like rope making. This is a must stop for all but especially for families with children. There is no charge for any who visit the Family Living Center.

Missionary demonstration, Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Missionary demonstration, Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

 

Map & Directions

The Family Living Center is located in the heart of lower Nauvoo or what is referred to as the Flats. It is located at 350 N Main Street (intersection of Main and White Streets). It is set back from Main Street behind the Cultural or Masonic Hall. The closest parking is on White Street between Main and Granger Streets. The gps coordinates are: 40°32’51” N; 91°23’33.61″ W.

Ownership Status

The Family Living Center is owned, operated and maintained by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is open to the public at no charge. Normal hours are 9-5.

Photos

Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Missionary demonstration, Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.
Missionary demonstration, Family Living Center, Nauvoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays.

Articles & Resources

Sources

Because of the nature of this site, there are not sources about it per se. There are ample sources about Nauvoo in general which would help provide background and context for this marvelous interpretive site. See, for example:

Glen M. Leonard, Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, A People of Promise.

George W. Givens, In Old Nauvoo: Everyday Life in the City of Joseph.

Susan Black, et al., Nauvoo.